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  Patient Recruitment - Pediatric Disorders
 

Research Studies        
Pediatric Mood and Anxiety Research   3. The dREMe Study: A trial of donepezil for REM sleep enhancement and improvement of ASD core symptoms   Evaluating Hallucinations & Delusions in Children  
1. Brain Imaging of Childhood Onset Psychiatric Disorders, Endocrine Disorders and Healthy Controls   1. Brain Changes in Children and Adolescents with Behavioral Problems   1. Clinical Trial of Citalopram and Methylphenidate in Severe Mood Dysregulation  
2. ADHD and Brain Development   1. A Study of Brain Function and Symptoms in Children who have Bipolar Disorder, or a Parent or Sibling with Bipolar Disorder   2. A Study of Brain Function and Symptoms in Children with Severe Mood Dysregulation  
3. Comparing Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder to Bipolar Disorder in Children: Investigations of Brain Function and Irritability   2. Clinical Trial of Citalopram and Methylphenidate in Severe Mood Dysregulation   Seminar: What Professionals Need to Know About Irritability, Bipolar Disorder and Disruptive Mood Dysregulation in Children  
4. Brain Imaging & Behavior of Children with ADHD   3. A Study of Brain Function and Symptoms in Children with Severe Mood Dysregulation   Study of Toddler Language Development  
1. Markers of Autism Spectrum Disorders in At-risk Toddlers: A Pilot Study   1. Brain Changes in Children and Adolescents with Conduct Disorder   1. Brain Imaging of Childhood Onset Psychiatric Disorders, Endocrine Disorders and Healthy Controls
2. Brain Behavior Study in Children   1. Brain Imaging of Childhood Onset Psychiatric Disorders, Endocrine Disorders and Healthy Controls  

Anxiety Disorders (Pediatric) Research Study

Pediatric Mood and Anxiety Research

This pediatric research study seeks to learn how the brain functions in children and adolescents with anxiety and/or depression. These studies seek boys and girls ages 8-17 to participate in research at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. Research participation includes brain imaging and computer-based problem solving and memory tasks. Treatment is available over 8 weeks of outpatient visits.

All participants will receive interviews to assess how they are doing in general, including his or her general mood, degree of nervousness and behavior. Each participant and one of his or her parents will be interviewed separately and together. All those enrolled in the study will have a physical examination. They will undergo tests involving problem-solving and memory and perform tasks that involve looking at pictures, remembering things, testing reaction times, and making simple choices.

Participants with anxiety or depression will first meet with a psychiatrist or psychologist for two weekly sessions of talk therapy. Those who remain anxious or depressed after these 2 weeks will have the 3 options based on their choice: 1) treatment with fluoxetine daily for 8 weeks 2) cognitive-behavioral therapy (a talk therapy) once a week for 8 weeks 3) a random assignment (50% chance) to either placebo or fluoxetine for 8 weeks. All participants will be seen approximately weekly for 8 weeks by a doctor to talk and complete verbal and written exercises. Blood samples will be drawn for laboratory tests before drug treatment and after it ends.

Those who have not improved by the end of the study will be offered other treatment for 1 to 3 months, and the clinicians will help with finding subsequent aftercare. Those who improve with treatment will continue therapy at NIH until an outside physician is able to assume responsibility for monitoring medication.

To find out if you qualify or for more information, please call (301) 402-8225 or email us at kidswithworries email.
 
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Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (Pediatric) Research Study

1. Brain Imaging of Childhood Onset Psychiatric Disorders, Endocrine Disorders and Healthy Controls

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) combines a powerful magnet, radio waves, and sophisticated computer technology to provide exquisitely accurate information about the anatomy and physiology of the living, growing human brain - and it does so without the use of harmful radiation. This allows not only for the scanning of children and teens but of repeated scans over the course of development and has launched a new era of adolescent neuroscience. In this study, researchers will use MRIs to assess brain anatomy and function in healthy volunteers and patients with a variety of childhood onset psychiatric disorders. Identical or non-identical twins are of particular interest for the study. Also, because of questions about differences between boy and girl brains people that have atypical hormone levels, such as in congenital adrenal hyperplasia or precocious puberty, or atypical sex chromosome numbers, such as XXY, XXX, XYY, or XXXXY will be included as well. In addition to the brain images, information will be collected about behavior, emotions, and cognition and combined with genetic testing to explore the relationships between genes, brain, and behavior.

To find out if you qualify or for more information, please call Diane Dillard Broadnax, LICSW, 301 496-7962, TTY: 1-866-411-1010, diane.dillardbroadnax email
 
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Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (Pediatric) Research Study

2. ADHD and Brain Development

Does your child have ADHD symptoms? Does your child get easily distracted, have trouble sitting still, talk excessively, have difficulty focusing, or interrupt often?

This research study seeks to understand brain development during childhood and brain changes over time.

We are now recruiting children ages 4-14 with ADHD symptoms or an ADHD diagnosis. Your child may be eligible to participate in 1-2 outpatient visits to the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. Participation includes an interview with parents and child, psychological testing, non-invasive brain scans, and genetic testing (from a saliva or blood sample.).

There is no cost to participate. Compensation is provided. Parental permission is required.

Contact Wendy Sharp, LCSW-C: 301-496-0851 (TTY: 1-866-411-1010) sharpw email
 
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Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (Pediatric) Research Study

3. Comparing Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder to Bipolar Disorder in Children: Investigations of Brain Function and Irritability

This research study seeks to learn about how attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and bipolar disorder (BD) are different in children and adolescents. Researchers will describe the moods and behaviors of children and investigate brain function and irritability. Children with ADHD are being invited to participate as a comparison group as part of a larger research protocol on children with bipolar disorder.

Currently recruiting ages 9-17, with an ADHD diagnosis to participate in 2 outpatient day visits. Children must be medically healthy, and free of bipolar disorder or any mood or other psychiatric disorder that requires treatment. Preference may be given to children who are able to be off stimulant medication for up to 3 days. Children with ADHD will not receive treatment in this study.

Participation includes interviews, research testing, and brain imaging scans.

The studies enroll local participants and are conducted at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. All clinical evaluations, research procedures and visits are free of cost. Travel expenses are paid by NIMH. Both parent and child must agree to the child's participation in research. Children and parents are compensated for participation.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, Call: 301-496-8381, TTY: 1-866-411-1010, or Email: bipolarkids email Ellen Leibenluft, M.D. or Kenneth Towbin, M.D.


 
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Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (Pediatric) Research Study

4. Brain Imaging & Behavior of Children with ADHD

The National Institute of Mental Health seeks children and adolescent participants ages 10 to 18, to enroll in this ADHD research study. Researchers are examining how emotions, social situations and problem-solving situations are processed in the brains of children with ADHD.

Eligible participants will be medically healthy, with an ADHD diagnosis, or have ADHD symptoms including inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity. Participation may include behavioral observation, brain imaging, and psychological interviews which include 1 to 3 outpatient visits, of 2-3 hours each, at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.

No treatment is offered. Parental permission is required. There is no cost to participate. Financial compensation and transportation assistance will be provided.

For information call: 301-594-8705, Email: kidsbehavior email
 
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Autism Spectrum Disorders (Pediatric) Research Study

1. Markers of Autism Spectrum Disorders in At-risk Toddlers: A Pilot Study

Researchers at the National Institute of Mental Health are seeking toddlers 10-14 or 16-20 months of age with language delays, such as having no words at 16-20 months of age or only limited vocalizations at 10-14 months of age, or with typical language development to participate in a study of language delay as a risk factor for autism.

The purpose of this study is to examine early language delay as a risk factor for autism and to examine how these delays correlate with brain structure and function. The study involves an initial evaluation that will include a caregiver interview and behavioral and language assessments of the child. Following the initial evaluation, participants will have an overnight EEG and an MRI scan of the brain. Follow-up outpatient visits without an EEG or MRI will occur every 6-12 months. The final study visit will occur at 36 months of age and will involve repeating behavioral assessments, sleep EEG recording, and MRI scan.

This study will involve both outpatient and inpatient visits and will be conducted at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.

Compensation will be provided. If you are interested please call 301-435-7962 (TTY: 1-866-411-1010) or e-mail: nimh-asd email
 
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Additional Study Information
 

 

Autism Spectrum Disorders (Pediatric) Research Study

2. Brain Behavior Study in Children

Researchers at the National Institute of Mental Health are seeking children between the ages of 4 years and 8 years who have been diagnosed with either an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) to participate in a study examining the use of Near Infra-Red Spectroscopy (NIRS). A group of children who are typically developing will also be recruited as a comparison group.

The purpose of this study is to test whether the NIRS system, which is a functional imaging technique that can monitor brain activity while allowing for movement, can be used to monitor cognitive brain activity and detect differences in children who are diagnosed with an ASD or ADHD. The study involves an initial screening evaluation that will include a comprehensive caregiver interview and behavioral assessment of the child. Eligible participants will then complete a NIRS scan while performing computer generated tasks. One follow-up visit at an 18 month interval will include another administration of the NIRS scan while the participant completes computer generated tasks. This study will involve outpatient visits and will be conducted at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.

The results of this study will provide information about the utility of the NIRS technique to detect differences in children with ASD or ADHD and may aid in the understanding of the cognitive functions that underlie these disorders.

Compensation will be provided. If you are interested please call 301-435-7962 (TTY: 1-866-411-1010) or e-mail nimh-asd email.
 
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Autism Spectrum Disorders (Pediatric) Research Study

3. The dREMe Study: A trial of donepezil for REM sleep enhancement and improvement of ASD core symptoms

The purpose of this study is to study the effect of donepezil (Ariceptr) on communication and other symptoms of ASD. All children enrolled in this study will receive behavioral and medical tests at a baseline evaluation. Participants will then be seen in the research clinic for periodic follow-up visits to track their developmental progress.

Children 24 to 50 months of age with ASD will be included.

This study requires eight visits to NIH over an 18 month period. Five overnight stays for sleep studies will be required. Your child will receive donepezil or placebo (a capsule without any medication in it) for 6 months. At the end of those six months, your child will stop taking the study capsule. After your child stops taking the capsule, he/she will continue to come to NIH to be tested. We will monitor the children for one year after their last dose of the study capsule to follow their development.

The study is conducted at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. There is no cost to participate and parental permission is required.

To find out if you qualify or for more information, please call (301) 435-7962 or email at nimh-asd email.
 
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Behavioral Problems (Pediatric) Research Study

1. Brain Changes in Children and Adolescents with Behavioral Problems

This study examines differences in social- and emotion-related brain activity in children and adolescents with disruptive behavior and conduct problems. All participants receive a cognitive and psychiatric screening. Those that are considered for further inclusion may participate in a second clinical interview. Participants selected for the study may do computer activities either on a laptop or inside an MRI scanner.

If your child is age 10-18, is medically healthy, has behavioral problems (like disruptiveness, anger, or aggression), and does not feel bad or guilty when they do something wrong, he or she may be eligible for the study.

To find out if your child qualifies or for more information, please call (301) 594-8705.
 
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Bipolar Disorder (Pediatric) Research Study

1. A Study of Brain Function and Symptoms in Children who have Bipolar Disorder, or a Parent or Sibling with Bipolar Disorder

This research protocol seeks to learn more about bipolar disorder in children and adolescents ages 6-17. Researchers will describe the moods and behaviors of children with bipolar disorder and use specialized testing and brain imaging to learn about specific brain changes associated with the disorder. This protocol studies children who have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder, and those who have a sibling or parent with bipolar disorder and are thus considered "at risk" for developing the disorder.

A) Descriptive/Longitudinal Study:

1 initial outpatient visit, then visits over time. Testing and brain imaging occurs at yearly visits, which can continue to age 25. Yearly phone contact occurs in between visits. (details below)

B) Treatment: Optional 4-5 month study with hospitalization to withdraw current medications followed by inpatient, outpatient, and/or day treatment. (details below)

C) Family Study: Phone Interview, initial outpatient visit, and yearly outpatient visits over time. This part of the protocol studies children who have a sibling or parent with bipolar disorder and are thus considered "at risk" for developing the disorder. (details below)

D) Sleep Study: 5-8 week inpatient stay (details below)

After a preliminary phone interview, participants may be invited to NIMH for an on-site interview. Children must be in treatment with a psychiatrist or provider, and/or medically healthy and not currently hospitalized, psychotic or suicidal. If eligibility criteria are met, participants may choose to enroll in the descriptive study, receive treatment, or do both. Study procedures include interviews, research testing, and brain imaging scans.

The studies are conducted at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland and enroll participants from across the USA. All clinical evaluations, research procedures, inpatient hospitalization and outpatient visits are free of cost. Travel expenses and lodging are paid by NIMH. Both parent and child must agree to the child`s participation in research. Children and parents are compensated for participation.

To find out about study criteria and qualifications, or for more information, please call (301 496-8381) or email us at bipolarkids email



Descriptive/Longitudinal Study: When children have bipolar disorder, do their brains work in ways that are different than those of other children? How do the symptoms of bipolar disorder change as children grow up?

This research study will describe the moods, behaviors and brain development of bipolar disorder in children over time. Participants, ages 6-17, may be invited to enroll after an initial outpatient visit. If found to be eligible based on their past mood and behaviors, they are invited to participate in follow-up. Face-to-face evaluations and study procedures occur at yearly study visits, which can continue to age 25. Yearly phone contact occurs in between visits.

Study procedures at these one to two day visits may include obtaining information about mood and behavior, research tasks, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Tasks includes questionnaires, interviews, and direct observation; tests of mood, memory, and thinking using paper-and-pencil and computer tests; behavioral research tasks; and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and functional MRI (fMRI) scans. Children continue in treatment with a provider or psychiatrist in their community. This part of the study does not involve treatment medications.

Treatment

Some children may be eligible to receive treatment at the NIH. During a portion of their stay for treatment, when they are off all medication, the study is designed to learn about mood, behavior and brain changes by asking children to perform MRI and computer tasks.

Some patients, ages 7-17, may be eligible to participate in this study over the course of a four to five months inpatient stay. This time may include outpatient visits and/or day treatment. To be eligible for this part of the study, children must be eligible for the longitudinal study and also be unstable/doing poorly on their current medications. The child must currently be in treatment with a psychiatrist in their community to participate. When clinically indicated, children may receive treatment that begins with gradually tapering off all medications. During a 2-week medication-free period children are invited to perform research and computer tasks, and have brain imaging scans, like those in the descriptive study.

Children also attend school and have recreation therapy while staying at NIH. After the medication-free period of observation, participants receive standard treatment medications and are supported to transition back to their local provider.

Family Study

Although most children with a parent or sibling with bipolar disorder do not themselves develop bipolar disorder, they are at increased risk to do so compared to children who do not have a relative with the illness. The purpose of this study is to compare symptoms and brain function in children "at risk" vs. children who are not at risk, with the ultimate goal of being able to predict who will develop the illness and how to prevent it.

In this study, children, ages 6-17 who have a parent or a sibling with bipolar disorder may participate in non-treatment research. Children may or may not have been diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder. Those taking medications for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder may be eligible for participation. This part of the study does not involve treatment. Families who are interested in enrolling complete preliminary telephone interviews. Eligibility is based on the past mood, behaviors, and diagnoses of their parent or sibling with bipolar disorder. Those who meet eligibility criteria are invited to come to NIMH for an initial outpatient visit. Children receive a clinical assessment and testing. If found to be eligible, these children will be invited to participate in follow-up over time and perform study procedures like those described in for the Descriptive Study (above).

Sleep Study

This research study seeks to learn about brain function, and the effects of sleep changes on mood in children diagnosed with bipolar disorder when they are off medication. Some patients, ages 7-17, may be eligible to participate in this inpatient sleep study that typically lasts 5- to 8-weeks. The child must currently be in treatment with a psychiatrist in their community to participate. Treatment includes gradually tapering children off all medications. During a 2-week medication-free period children undergo periods of extended and reduced sleep, and are invited to perform research and computer tasks and have brain imaging scans like those in the descriptive study (above).
 
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Bipolar Disorder (Pediatric) Research Study

2. Clinical Trial of Citalopram and Methylphenidate in Severe Mood Dysregulation

This study is testing the effectiveness of methylphenidate plus citalopram vs. methylphenidate plus placebo for decreasing irritability in children with severe mood dysregulation (SMD). Children with SMD display chronic anger, sadness, or irritability, as well as hyperarousal (such as insomnia, distractibility, hyperactivity) and extreme responses to frustration (such as frequent, severe temper tantrums).

Children ages seven to 17 with SMD may be eligible to participate in this 12- to 15-week inpatient or outpatient study. This study has four phases. During Phase I participants are gradually withdrawn from all current psychotropic medications. Phase II is a one-week psychotropic medication-free period. During Phase III, which lasts two weeks, participants are treated with methylphenidate alone. Phase IV lasts for eight weeks. During this time, participants continue methylphenidate treatment and are randomly assigned to also receive either citalopram or placebo.

At the end of the study, those who received methylphenidate plus placebo will have the opportunity to receive methylphenidate plus active citalopram if clinically appropriate.

All procedures and medications associated with the research are provided at no cost to participants, and transportation expenses are reimbursed by NIMH. Schooling will be provided while on the inpatient unit or in day treatment.

To find out if you qualify or for more information, please call (301) 496-8381 or email us at irritablekids email.


 
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Bipolar Disorder (Pediatric) Research Study

3. A Study of Brain Function and Symptoms in Children with Severe Mood Dysregulation

This study seeks to learn more about the symptoms of severe mood dysregulation in children and adolescents ages 7-17. Children and adolescents with severe mood dysregulation (SMD) display chronic anger, sadness, or irritability, as well as hyperarousal (such as insomnia, distractibility, hyperactivity) and extreme responses to frustration (such as frequent, severe temper tantrums). Researchers will describe the moods and behaviors of children with these symptoms and use specialized testing and brain imaging to learn about the brain changes associated with this disorder.

Study participation begins with an initial outpatient evaluation that lasts one day. Then, testing and brain imaging are completed at two-three day outpatient visits which occur every two years until participants reach age 25. Phone contact occurs every six months in between visits.

Descriptive/Longitudinal Study: When children have severe mood dysregulation (SMD), do their brains work differently than those of other children? How do their symptoms change as the children grow up?

After a preliminary phone interview, participants may be invited to NIMH for an on-site assessment. Children must be in treatment with a psychiatrist or provider, and/or medically healthy and not currently hospitalized, psychotic or suicidal.

A principal focus of the research is how mood, behavior, and brain development of children with severe mood dysregulation (SMD) change over time. Study procedures at the two-three day visits may include questionnaires and interviews; paper-and-pencil and computer tests of mood, memory, and thinking; specialized computer games; and structural and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans. These visits occur every two years until age 25. Children continue in treatment with a provider or psychiatrist in their community. This study does not involve treatment medications.

To find out if you qualify, or for more information, please call (301) 496-8381 or email us at irritablekids email.
 
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Conduct Disorder (Pediatric) Research Study

1. Brain Changes in Children and Adolescents with Conduct Disorder

This study examines differences in social- and emotion-related brain activity in children and adolescents with disruptive behavior and conduct problems. All participants receive a cognitive and psychiatric screening. Those that are considered for further inclusion may participate in a second clinical interview. Participants selected for the study may do computer activities either on a laptop or inside an MRI scanner.

If your child is age 10-18, is medically healthy, has behavioral problems (like disruptiveness, anger, or aggression), and does not feel bad or guilty when they do something wrong, he or she may be eligible for the study.

To find out if your child qualifies or for more information, please call (301) 594-8705.
 
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Down Syndrome (Pediatric) Research Study

1. Brain Imaging of Childhood Onset Psychiatric Disorders, Endocrine Disorders and Healthy Controls

The purpose of the study is to examine how the brain develops in youth with Down syndrome. The study aims to increase our understanding of the links between brain differences and the unique pattern of strengths and challenges in learning and memory associated with Down syndrome.

Two groups will be included: youth (ages 3-30) with a confirmed chromosomal diagnosis of Down syndrome and youth with typical development (ages 3-30). Participation will involve brain imaging (utilizing magnetic resonance imaging or MRI, a medical imaging technique that takes a detailed picture of the brain without use of radiation) and learning and memory testing. An optional blood test for genetic analyses is also requested.

All of the evaluation procedures are provided free of charge and will take between 8 and 10 hours to complete on an outpatient basis (during either three or four visits) to the NIH campus in Bethesda, MD. Parents of participants will be asked to complete questionnaires about their child's development as well. Parental, legal guardian, and/or young adult consent is required for participation. Compensation will be provided.

To find out if your child qualifies or to obtain more information, please call Nancy Raitano Lee, Ph.D. at (301) 435-4520 or email lnancy email
 
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Hallucinations and Thought Disorders (Pediatric) Research Study

Evaluating Hallucinations & Delusions in Children

Studies show that hallucinations and delusions can be part of normal childhood development. This research study is investigating brain functioning associated with hallucinations (auditory and visual) and delusions in children as part of a larger research protocol on childhood psychosis.

Researchers are currently recruiting children ages 6-13 who hear voices, see things not there, or are overly suspicious. Eligible participants must be medically healthy and free of neurological illness, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, autism, seizures, and illicit drug use.

Study participation includes 2-3 outpatient visits to the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. Study procedures may include interviews, psychiatric, medical and genetic testing, and an MRI brain scan. Participants may be invited for follow-up visits.

There is no cost to participate. Parental permission is required.

Contact: Diane Dillard Broadnax, LICSW, 301 496-7962, TTY: 1-866-411-1010 diane.dillardbroadnax email
 
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Irritability (Pediatric) Research Study

1. Clinical Trial of Citalopram and Methylphenidate in Severe Mood Dysregulation

This study is testing the effectiveness of methylphenidate plus citalopram vs. methylphenidate plus placebo for decreasing irritability in children with severe mood dysregulation (SMD). Children with SMD display chronic anger, sadness, or irritability, as well as hyperarousal (such as insomnia, distractibility, hyperactivity) and extreme responses to frustration (such as frequent, severe temper tantrums).

Children ages seven to 17 with SMD may be eligible to participate in this 12- to 15-week inpatient or outpatient study. This study has four phases. During Phase I participants are gradually withdrawn from all current psychotropic medications. Phase II is a one-week psychotropic medication-free period. During Phase III, which lasts two weeks, participants are treated with methylphenidate alone. Phase IV lasts for eight weeks. During this time, participants continue methylphenidate treatment and are randomly assigned to also receive either citalopram or placebo.

At the end of the study, those who received methylphenidate plus placebo will have the opportunity to receive methylphenidate plus active citalopram if clinically appropriate.

All procedures and medications associated with the research are provided at no cost to participants, and transportation expenses are reimbursed by NIMH. Schooling will be provided while on the inpatient unit or in day treatment.

To find out if you qualify or for more information, please call (301) 496-8381 or email us at irritablekids email.
 
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Irritability (Pediatric) Research Study

2. A Study of Brain Function and Symptoms in Children with Severe Mood Dysregulation

This study seeks to learn more about the symptoms of severe mood dysregulation in children and adolescents ages 7-17. Children and adolescents with severe mood dysregulation (SMD) display chronic anger, sadness, or irritability, as well as hyperarousal (such as insomnia, distractibility, hyperactivity) and extreme responses to frustration (such as frequent, severe temper tantrums). Researchers will describe the moods and behaviors of children with these symptoms and use specialized testing and brain imaging to learn about the brain changes associated with this disorder.

Study participation begins with an initial outpatient evaluation that lasts one day. Then, testing and brain imaging are completed at two-three day outpatient visits which occur every two years until participants reach age 25. Phone contact occurs every six months in between visits.

Descriptive/Longitudinal Study: When children have severe mood dysregulation (SMD), do their brains work differently than those of other children? How do their symptoms change as the children grow up?

After a preliminary phone interview, participants may be invited to NIMH for an on-site assessment. Children must be in treatment with a psychiatrist or provider, and/or medically healthy and not currently hospitalized, psychotic or suicidal.

A principal focus of the research is how mood, behavior, and brain development of children with severe mood dysregulation (SMD) change over time. Study procedures at the two-three day visits may include questionnaires and interviews; paper-and-pencil and computer tests of mood, memory, and thinking; specialized computer games; and structural and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans. These visits occur every two years until age 25. Children continue in treatment with a provider or psychiatrist in their community. This study does not involve treatment medications.

To find out if you qualify, or for more information, please call (301) 496-8381 or email us at irritablekids email.
 
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Irritability (Pediatric) Research Study

Seminar: What Professionals Need to Know About Irritability, Bipolar Disorder and Disruptive Mood Dysregulation in Children

March 28, 2014, 9am-12pm

Join expert Dr. Kenneth Towbin, M.D., Child & Adolescent Psychiatrist at NIMH, for an in-depth discussion of pediatric bipolar disorder, severe mood dysregulation, and the new DSM.5 diagnosis Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder (DMDD). Through the lens of the latest research, participants will explore the challenging symptom presentations seen in children diagnosed with these disorders. Professionals will have the opportunity to compare disorders through case presentations, and discuss diagnostic considerations and effective assessment tools. A review and dialogue of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions will follow.

Participants will learn to: Recognize the differences between and nuances of Bipolar Disorder, Severe Mood Dysregulation, and Disruptive Mood Dysregulation in children and adolescents; Understand, identify, and distinguish disorders that commonly display symptoms of irritability in children; Discuss assessment tips and guidelines when working with children with these disorders and their families; Explore treatment implications for these disorders.

3 Category I CEU credits are available for social workers licensed in Maryland. Certificates of attendance will be provided for participants. This event is free and open to the public. Seating is limited.

About the Presenter: Dr. Towbin is Chief of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in the Emotion and Development Branch at the National Institute of Mental Health Intramural Research Program. The group with which he is affiliated focuses its research on identifying and treating childhood bipolar disorder and severe irritability in children. His interests include emotional dysregulation in children and adolescents, bipolar disorder, tic disorders, obsessive compulsive disorder, and pervasive developmental disorders.

Location: Johns Hopkins University- Montgomery County Campus, 9601 Medical Center Drive, A & R Building, Room 106-110, Rockville, MD. Directions and Parking information: http://mcc.jhu.edu/about/directions.

To Register: Contact Kalene DeHaut, MSW at kalene.dehaut email with your name, phone number, and social work licensure level (if applicable) before 3/14/2014.
 
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Language Delays Research Study

Study of Toddler Language Development

Researchers at the National Institute of Mental Health are seeking toddlers 12 or 18 months of age with language delays (i.e., no words at 18 months, limited vocalizations at 12 months) or typical development to participate in a study.

Most children with language delays do not develop autism. However, we hope this study will help inform us about the risk factors.

The study involves an initial screening evaluation that will include a comprehensive caregiver interview and behavioral assessment. Eligible participants will then complete an overnight sleep study/EEG and an MRI scan. Follow-up visits that include behavioral assessment will occur every 6-12 months, with the final study visit occurring at 36 months of age. Participants enrolled at 12 months of age will have 3 follow-up visits (18, 24 months and a final visit at 36 months), and participants enrolled at 18 months will have 2 follow-up visits (24 months and a final visit at 36 months). The final study visit will involve behavioral assessment, sleep/EEG study, and MRI.

This study will involve both outpatient and inpatient visits and will be conducted at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.

Compensation will be provided. If you are interested please call 301-435-7962 (TTY: 1-866-411-1010) or e-mail nimh-asd email
 
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Schizophrenia (Pediatric) Research Study

1. Brain Imaging of Childhood Onset Psychiatric Disorders, Endocrine Disorders and Healthy Controls

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) combines a powerful magnet, radio waves, and sophisticated computer technology to provide exquisitely accurate information about the anatomy and physiology of the living, growing human brain - and it does so without the use of harmful radiation. This allows not only for the scanning of children and teens but of repeated scans over the course of development and has launched a new era of adolescent neuroscience. In this study, researchers will use MRIs to assess brain anatomy and function in healthy volunteers and patients with a variety of childhood onset psychiatric disorders. Identical or non-identical twins are of particular interest for the study. Also, because of questions about differences between boy and girl brains people that have atypical hormone levels, such as in congenital adrenal hyperplasia or precocious puberty, or atypical sex chromosome numbers, such as XXY, XXX, XYY, or XXXXY will be included as well. In addition to the brain images, information will be collected about behavior, emotions, and cognition and combined with genetic testing to explore the relationships between genes, brain, and behavior.

To find out if you qualify or for more information, please call Diane Dillard Broadnax, LICSW, 301 496-7962, TTY: 1-866-411-1010, diane.dillardbroadnax email
 
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